On Waiting For Godot, or How This Existential Absurdist Play Made Me Contemplate My Relationship to Ideas of Partnership, Depression and Religion

On Waiting For Godot, or How This Existential Absurdist Play Made Me Contemplate My Relationship to Ideas of Partnership, Depression and Religion
Waiting for Godot set at Theatre Royal Haymarket 2009

 

Since I have an MFA in an aspect of theatre, I’ve read a lot of plays, and I am no stranger to the work of Samuel Beckett.

I first saw a production of Waiting for Godot as a senior in high school while visiting what would become my undergrad theatre department in 2004. I knew nothing about the play, and, while I claimed to be an artsy and intelligent student, I was pretty perplexed by it all.

Waiting for Godot is an existential absurdist play in which two characters, Vladimir and Estragon, are stuck in an eternal loop of limbo in which they are constantly waiting for a character named “Godot” who never comes.

Continue reading “On Waiting For Godot, or How This Existential Absurdist Play Made Me Contemplate My Relationship to Ideas of Partnership, Depression and Religion”

On Intersectional Feminism and Foreign Films, or How an Intro to Womens’ Studies Professor Changed The Course of My Whole Life

On Intersectional Feminism and Foreign Films, or How an Intro to Womens’ Studies Professor Changed The Course of My Whole Life

It was the fall of 2007, the beginning of my Senior year of undergrad. I had been curious about the whole topic of “feminism” and “Women’s Studies” and was thrilled that a course could finally fit into my schedule. And I was excited that my professor was going to be Jennifer Young.

Jennifer Young was a young black woman with dreadlocks, barely 30 years old, and was a faculty member of the English department. For my small private Christian college in the midwest, that was all sorts of varieties of progressive. She had spoken at my freshman Convocation ceremony in 2004, and later, would be given the “Outstanding Professor Educator” award by my graduating class in 2008.

And she was awesome. Approachable, relateable, delightful and enthusiastic, she broke down the theories behind “Intersectional Feminism.”

Continue reading “On Intersectional Feminism and Foreign Films, or How an Intro to Womens’ Studies Professor Changed The Course of My Whole Life”

On the Vulnerability of Being An Artist, or Oh Goodness I Hope I Have Something People Actually Want To Read

On the Vulnerability of Being An Artist, or Oh Goodness I Hope I Have Something People Actually Want To Read

Mark Rothko Red On Maroon
Panel from Red On Maroon Mural (1959) by Mark Rothko (via)

Last night, I attended a performance of the John Logan play RED produced at my place of employment.

It’s a fascinating play featuring dialogue about art, philosophy, and life through the lens of the artist Mark Rothko in the late 1950s.

I was especially struck by a line that Rothko said when he was asked about how he felt about sending his art out into the world.

Selling a picture is like sending a blind child into a room full of razor blades. It’s going to get hurt and it’s never been hurt before, it doesn’t know what hurt is.”

–Rothko, in the play RED by John Logan

This was such an apt description of the vulnerability of being an artist, and the tenuous release of one’s work into the cruel world of critique and opinions.

Continue reading “On the Vulnerability of Being An Artist, or Oh Goodness I Hope I Have Something People Actually Want To Read”